LANGUAGE EXTENSIONS

• DISCUSS MODELS
Have students describe models they own or have seen (cars, planes, dolls, horses, globes). Ask them to compare the size and features of the model to the actual object.

• DESCRIBE ROUTES
Have students write a detailed description of how to get from one location in the school to another location. Have them write a description of how to get from their house to the school.

• DESCRIBE FIRE-ESCAPE ROUTES
Have students describe the fire-escape routes from the school classroom and mark them on a map of the school.

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MATH EXTENSIONS

Measurement Science Stories

No. 29—Student Sheet

• PROBLEM OF THE WEEK
Jessie's group decided they wanted to make a map of their schoolyard on a larger sheet of paper. The largest sheet of paper they could use was a square measuring 100 cm on a side. They used a trundle wheel to measure the lengths of the school boundaries. The sketch shows their measurements.

Think about the size of paper they have to draw their map.
• In order for Jessie to fit the whole schoolyard on this sheet of paper, how many meters should each centimeter equal on the map? Show your work.
• Use the drawing to estimate the longest side of the game field.

Notes on the Problem. Students may come up with several ways to solve the first part of the problem, how to fit the map on the sheet of paper available. The simplest way to figure out an answer is to divide 500 m by 100 cm to get an answer of 5 meters per 1 cm. If students think a bit harder, they might realize that this will fill the space from top to bottom, and they may want to come up with a slightly different scale to allow for more space around the map.

They should estimate that the game field is more than half the width of the schoolyard and so will measure at least 125 m on its longest side.

• MAKE PROPORTIONAL DRAWINGS
Challenge students to create enlarged versions of cartoons or drawings using the proportional drawing technique. For example, they could enlarge a newspaper cartoon two times by using the Overlay Grid (its squares are 2 cm on a side) and a larger paper grid with squares 4 cm on a side. To do this, they would place the overlay on the cartoon. Whatever is in one of the Overlay Grid squares should be duplicated in the larger paper square.

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SOCIAL STUDIES EXTENSION

• READ OTHER MAPS
Bring in city or county road maps and have students find the school and their house on the map. Have them invent a symbol to represent the school and their homes and use them on the map.

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SCIENCE EXTENSIONS

• CREATE A PERMANENT MODEL
Encourage students to create a more permanent model of their schoolyard or local area. They could use clay or papier-mâché and paint the model. Remind them to include a key.

• FIND SCHOOL-SITE PLANS
Check with the principal for copies of the school-site plans and blueprints. Students can compare them with the maps they have drawn.

• PLAN THE PERFECT SCHOOL
Challenge students to work in their groups to create a perfect school. Have them draw it on a large sheet of paper. The school-site picture should show locations for playing fields, classrooms, the parking lot, and so forth. The drawing should show details like bike racks, drinking fountains, gardens, nature areas, and the flagpole.

When the school drawings are complete, have students make maps of their schools on copies of the Map Grid. Drawing evenly spaced lines on their picture would help them accurately transfer the information to the paper Map Grid. Display the pictures and maps.

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HOME/SCHOOL CONNECTION

Students use a grid to draw a map of all or part of their home. They include two escape routes in case of a fire. Have them explain why they chose the escape routes they drew. Ask them to bring in blueprints of their homes, if they are available.

Make copies of student sheet no. 34, Home/School Connection for Investigation 1, and send it home with students after the third part of this investigation.

 

Measurement Science Stories

No. 34—Student Sheet

 

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